The Magic Lantern: Having a Ball and Christmas Eve

By José Tomás de Cuéllar; Margo Glantz et al. | Go to book overview

IX
Conclusion

Soon after, the sun rose. Dawn arrived with its clean, blue- tinged rays, revealing a scene of debauchery that had only recently been abandoned by human swine.

Out of the dining room and the salon came a vapor reeking of alcohol and human smells, so heavy that it practically crawled along the floor, as if reluctant to do battle with the pure, diaphanous atmosphere of the morning. A rose-colored light peeked through the balustrade on the balcony and spied on the ruins in the dining room, which looked like Agramant's camp. The light filtered through the curtains and crept between the flower pots, painting blue fillets on the wine glasses and the candelabras, whose candles had dripped a trail of stearine wax onto the tablecloths. The carpet was drenched in wine and planted with shards of broken glass; there was Gruyère cheese on the chairs, under the tables, inside the glasses and on hats; and squashed pastries covered whatever flowers were still visible in the carpet. The table exhibited all the scars of battle, as more bottles and glasses were broken and overturned than were left standing.

-115-

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The Magic Lantern: Having a Ball and Christmas Eve
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editors'' General Introduction vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxxiii
  • Prologue 3
  • Having a Ball 5
  • I- Preparations for the Ball 7
  • II- How Couples Were Recruited and Guests Invited 15
  • III- About the Machuca Sisters and Others like Them 25
  • IV- In Which, among Other Things, the Girls Who Frequent the Pane Baths Prepare Themselves for the Colonel''s Ball 34
  • V- Concerning What Happened to the Virtue of a Lady Invited to Saldaña''s Ball 45
  • VI- How the Appearances Maintained by These Upstarts Tend to Compromise Any Serious Result 69
  • VII- The Ball Begins 79
  • VII- How the Heat from Candles, Combined with a Santa Barbara Cognac and Other Evils, Can Create Pandemonium at a Ball 100
  • IX- Conclusion 115
  • Christmas Eve - Negatives Exposed from December 24 To December 25, 1882 119
  • I 121
  • II 123
  • III 126
  • IV 129
  • V 133
  • VI 136
  • VII 140
  • VIII 142
  • IX 146
  • XI 156
  • XII 162
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