The Comparative Approach to American History

By C. Vann Woodward | Go to book overview

17
Socialism
and Labor

DAVID A. SHANNON

With the exception of the United States, all the major industrial countries of the world--as well as many of the nations which are becoming industrialized only in the present generation--have some kind of Marxist political movement of significant proportions. These political movements embrace a wide range of the political spectrum, from various kinds of Communists (Soviet, Titoist, Maoist) to various kinds of social democrats, such as the British Labour Party, the West German Social Democratic party, and the Scandinavian socialists. National character, different traditions, and problems or conditions peculiar to a nation create some interesting variations, as in Mexico, for example. The differences between these parties and their programs are wide and important, but all of them derive in one way or another from the thought of Karl Marx. In most of these parties the trade unions or other organizations of industrial labor play an important role. In the United States, however, there is nothing quite comparable. There are many kinds of Marxist political organizations in America, from Maoists to mild social democrats, but none is politically important. In the highly unlikely event of their coalescing into a single party they still would be very

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The Comparative Approach to American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • The Contributors vii
  • Introduction to the New Edition xi
  • 1 - The Comparability of American History 3
  • 2 - The Colonial Phase 18
  • 3 - The Enlightenment 34
  • 4 - The Revolution 47
  • 5 - The "Newness" of the New Nation 62
  • 6 - Frontiers 75
  • 7 - Immigration 91
  • 8 - Mobility 106
  • 9 - Slavery 121
  • 10 - Civil War 135
  • 11 - Reconstruction: Ultraconservative Revolution 146
  • 12 - The Negro since Freedom 160
  • 13 - Industrialization 175
  • 14 - Urbanization 187
  • 15 - Political Parties 206
  • 16 - The Coming of Big Business 220
  • 17 - Socialism and Labor 238
  • 18 - Imperialism 253
  • 19 - Social Democracy, 1900-1918 271
  • 20 - World War I 285
  • 21 - The Great Depression 296
  • 22 - World War II 315
  • 23 - The Cold War 328
  • 24 - The Test of Comparison 346
  • Index 359
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