The Faustian Bargain: The Art World in Nazi Germany

By Jonathan Petropoulos | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In researching and writing this book, I have relied upon the assistance of friends and colleagues in innumerable ways. In an attempt to make some sense of the crucial yet diverse support, I would like to thank the following individuals.

I am very grateful to my colleagues at Loyola College, who have offered not just intellectual stimulation, but friendship and camaraderie. I will miss them very much as I move on to a new position at Claremont McKenna College. Joanne Dabney, the administrator of the History Department deserves special recognition for her tireless efforts. I would also thank Deans David Roswell and John Hollwitz, who have provided me with the resources needed to conduct research in Europe. I owe a debt of gratitude to the Loyola Center for the Humanities for several summer grants and a junior faculty sabbatical. The German Academic Exchange Service awarded me two fellowships, which permitted valuable research trips to Germany. The Holocaust Educational Foundation and its president, Theodore Zev Weiss, also provided much needed financial assistance.

I would convey special thanks to friends who took the time to read the manuscript. James Van Dyke, Paul Jaskot, Scott Denham, Günter Bischof, Chris Jackson, Rebecca Boehling, Ines Schlenker, Stephan Lindner, Marion Deshmukh, and Geoffrey Giles read all or part of the book. I take responsibility for all of its shortcomings, but there would have been many more without their assistance. Similarly, the opportunity to present my findings at lectures and symposia elicited very useful feedback. In this respect, I would thank the following for their suggestions: O. K. Werckmeister, Peter Hayes, Eugen Blume, Dieter Schmidt, Wolfgang Wittrock, Keith Holz, Sabine Eckmann, Christoph Zuschlag, John Czaplicka, Jan Tabor, and Rosl Merdinger. I would also thank

-xi-

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The Faustian Bargain: The Art World in Nazi Germany
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 Art Museum Directors 13
  • Chapter 2 Art Dealers 63
  • Chapter 3 Art Journalists 111
  • Chapter 4 Art Historians 165
  • Chapter 5 Artists 215
  • Conclusion 273
  • Notes 281
  • Bibliography 351
  • Index 377
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