The Faustian Bargain: The Art World in Nazi Germany

By Jonathan Petropoulos | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
Art Historians

The art history profession has long been rela
tively diffuse because it included individuals outside academic depart
ments: curators, dealers, and critics have all penned serious books on art
history. If one takes Fogg Museum director Paul Sachs's list from the
spring of 1945 in which he assessed the qualities and skills of individu
als in a range of German artistic professions, one sees personnel across
the spectrum, both inside and outside academia, described as "good
scholar" or "fine scholar" (this includes, for example, the Berlin graphic
arts curator Friedrich Winkler and the Munich curator Karl Feuchtmayr). 1 To focus on art historians with university appointments, then,
would be too limiting and would not accurately convey the professional
context in which scholarship was produced.

One can, of course, write a history of just the academic art historians during the Third Reich and how the profession was effectively bifurcated in 1933. 2 A tremendous number chose emigration, and this includes luminaries such as Erwin Panofsky, Aby Warburg, Walter Friedlaender, and Richard Krautheimer, among others. 3 Karen Michels wrote,

-165-

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The Faustian Bargain: The Art World in Nazi Germany
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 Art Museum Directors 13
  • Chapter 2 Art Dealers 63
  • Chapter 3 Art Journalists 111
  • Chapter 4 Art Historians 165
  • Chapter 5 Artists 215
  • Conclusion 273
  • Notes 281
  • Bibliography 351
  • Index 377
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