The American Road to World Peace

By Alfred Zimmern | Go to book overview

Consider the effects of the Roman imperial tradition upon the political life of Europe. We will not dwell on the fact that it became a cause of perpetual rivalry and disorder during the Middle Age between the partisans of the revived empire and the papacy. What is important for these pages is that, when the medieval system eventually broke up, not through external conquest but through its own inner weakness, the local territorial rulers, who filled the vacuum of power, could not rid themselves of the imperial obsession. They saw themselves as emperors on a smaller scale and their kingdoms as portion of a world empire in the making; a curious illustration of this way of thinking occurred even in the present century, when the German Emperor, William II, styling himself "the Emperor of the Atlantic," designated the Czar of Russia as "the Emperor of the Pacific." And even the smaller states, to whom such hopes and dreams were denied, often followed the prevailing fashion of seeking aggrandizement, either by local adventures or as satellites of the great.


CHAPTER 18: The Concept of Sovereignty

THIS was the system--if system it can be called--which was prevailing in Europe when the people of the United States proclaimed their independence in 1776. It was one in which each state was bent on increasing its power and improving its position at the expense of its neighbors, near or far. It was, in fact, a system which was competitive through and through; only the rivalry was not a rivalry for wealth, as the name "competitive" suggests to our own minds today, but for power. The notion of co-operation, which was embodied in the medieval concept of a common Christendom, had receded completely into the background, even in the minds of thinkers.

These competing states were known as "sovereign" because, apart from a few exceptional cases, they Were governed by in-

-44-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Road to World Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 287

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.