The American Road to World Peace

By Alfred Zimmern | Go to book overview

essential. They will likewise aid and encourage all other practicable measures which will lighten, for peace-loving peoples, the crushing burden of armaments.

This, the Prime Minister at once remarked, omitted the reference in his own draft to an "effective international organization." He suggested the insertion of the words "pending the establishment of a wider and more permanent system of general security" before the reference to disarmament. This the President accepted.

The declaration was published on August 14 and soon came to be known as "The Atlantic Charter." It was well received in the United States, the principal criticism made against it being that, while it provided for three of the Four Freedoms, it made no mention of Freedom of Religion. This omission was soon rectified, as we shall see.


CHAPTER 55: The Joint United Nations Declaration

ON Sunday December 14, 1941, one week after Pearl Harbor and four months after the drafting of the Atlantic Charter, the Secretary of State asked one of his chief officials to "draw up a draft of a declaration to be made by the nations fighting the Axis, which would bind them together until victory and would commit them to the basic principles we uphold." Five days later the draft was sent to the President and three days after that Mr. Winston Churchill arrived in Washington. The President and he conferred together on the document, which was also shown to the Soviet and Chinese ambassadors. A slight change in the wording had been made to get over the difficulty that the Soviet Union was not at war with Japan. In accepting the document with minor amendments two days later, after it had been transmitted to Mos-

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