The American Road to World Peace

By Alfred Zimmern | Go to book overview

Francisco Conference, he should divide his introductory analysis into two parts: the Charter "in its capacity as declaration and the. Charter in its capacity as constitution." The transition from treaty to constitution had been accomplished-at least in the minds of the representatives of the United States. It is from that standpoint, therefore, that we shall conduct our analysis of the organs of the United Nations.


CHAPTER 63: The Constitutional Pattern

A constitution is not a miscellaneous collection of social rules or "laws." It is a definite piece of social construction, embodying a recognized pattern. Any despot can frame social rules and call them laws. But laws, in the true sense of that word, are constitutional rules, and this implies that there is a permanent constitution behind them. To the Greeks, the originators of constitutional government, a constitution (politeia) was, in its original meaning, an abstract term, denoting the political quality, or what we should today call the way of life, of the community, democratic or aristocratic as the case might be. But when the political thinkers began to analyze what their predecessors, the creators, had accomplished, they discerned in it a pattern. Since this pattern is, let us say so boldly, the right pattern, a pattern which corresponds to the nature of the public affairs with which constitutions are brought into existence to deal, it has become an orthodox or standard pattern, one to which all modern constitution-makers, whether they are true constitutionalists or not, feel it right and expedient to conform. Thus the Soviet Union has a constitution framed according to the standard prescriptions and nobody reading it, and unfamiliar with the conditions in that country, could guess that those who hold power there are totally unable to understand the meaning of the words: "the Rule of Law."

-209-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Road to World Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 287

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.