The American Road to World Peace

By Alfred Zimmern | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 67: The Legislature and its Awkward Neighbor

IN performing the functions which have just been described, functions of legislation and deliberation, the General Assembly, like its predecessor, the Assembly of the League of Nations, has been hampered by the existence of another body for which place was found in the constitution. This awkward neighbor was known in the League Covenant by the comprehensive title of "The Council," while in the United Nations system it bears the more restricted name of "The Security Council."

This restriction marks an important milestone in the constitutional evolution of the World Authority. Under the system of the Covenant, into which, as we have seen, the Assembly was introduced by an afterthought as a kind of appendage, the legislative process embodied in the World Services was placed under the supervision of this "Council." The Assembly was indeed free to discuss the work of what were then known as "the Technical Organizations," but the control and responsibility rested with the Council, to which their annual reports were submitted for approval. As, after 1925, the Council was mainly occupied with matters of high policy, its members were little interested in the so-called "technical" subjects and were also, as a rule, not at all well qualified to deal with them. Indeed, in some cases, particular states used these technical agencies for their own nationalistic purposes, thus interfering with their inner working; for at that time the autonomy guaranteed to the Specialized Agencies under the United Nations system had not yet been established and, by the system which divided up the business of the Council among rapporteurs, it was possible for individual countries to acquire something of a private domain of their own and thus to build up what amounted to a vested interest.

These unsatisfactory conditions formed the subject of a League Inquiry in the late thirties and its conclusions, embodied in the

-218-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Road to World Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 287

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.