The American Road to World Peace

By Alfred Zimmern | Go to book overview

been recognized sooner instead of being obscured by wishful thinking and sterile "ideological" controversies! There have been many occasions since the unfortunate events of October, 1917, when effective action could have been taken and it is only fair to recall that the Swiss, with their long experience of free institutions and their well-trained judgment, showed unerring insight in this matter. On the day when the Soviet delegation was admitted to the League of Nations, one could sense an atmosphere of intense fear mingled with indignation. The Swiss people wondered whether that day was not the funeral of peace and freedom for the world. As matters now are, the problem is much more difficult and complicated to deal with, but effective solutions could still be found. In the battle of principles which lies before us, the details are incalculable and the timing uncertain. But, if the Westem peoples remain true to themselves and have moral courage, the victory of good government and peace can be won.


CHAPTER 72: A Blue Print of the Eventual Executive

IN Chapter 70 we saw what kind of an executive the United Nations needs--a body of some seven dedicated and experienced men constituting a living example of the equality of peoples. But we have as yet said nothing as to how such a body could be brought into existence.

Clearly, the General Assembly is not a body well suited for such a task. There is too great a disproportion between its voting system and the responsibilities which lie behind it. It is good that the small states should be well represented there and no lover of democracy would wish to stifle any voice that is the authentic expression of a nation, however limited in numbers. But a body on which nine-tenths of the financial burden is borne by one-tenth of the members and all have a vote of equal value is clearly not

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