Preface to Drama: An Introduction to Dramatic Literature and Theater Art

By Charles W. Cooper | Go to book overview

VIII. THE CRUCIBLE
An Historical Play by Arthur Miller

Introductory Note to Arthur Miller and The Crucible

TWO POSTWAR DRAMATISTS--Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller--have written plays that seem likely to endure. Within a year of the same age, both of them experienced the Great Depression. Neither, because of physical disabilities, was engaged in World War II. Both men had training with competent university professors of playwriting. Their prize-winning successes and international fame as new dramatists came within the same few years. Each has written two powerful dramas of highly original dramaturgy. But there the similarity ends, and the short and tall, smooth and rugged contrasts begin: Williams from the South, a wanderer upon the earth; Miller from Brooklyn, at home in Con­ necticut. One a "dramatist of frustration," the other a playwright of positive protest.

Arthur Miller was born on the upper East side of New York, the Harlem section, the son of Isidore and Augusta (Barnett) Miller. The family moved to Brooklyn, where Arthur went to high school. Then he worked for two years, in an auto-parts warehouse, to save money enough to begin at the University of Michigan. There he made his own way, with an N.Y.A. Depression job and as night editor of the Michigan Daily, and wrote plays, studying under Kenneth T. Rowe. He won the Avery Hopwood award for play- writing in 1936 and again in 1937 for $500. In 1938 he took his A.B. degree and won the Theater Guild National Award of $1250. He then went back to New York and began writing for the Federal Theater Project, which was curtailed before his first script was produced. He turned to radio drama and wrote for Columbia Workshop and Cavalcade of America. In 1940 he married his university classmate, Mary Grace Slattery; they have two children. A high-school football injury kept him from active war service, though he worked as a steamfitter at the Brooklyn Navy Yard and

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Preface to Drama: An Introduction to Dramatic Literature and Theater Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Part One - The Preface 1
  • I - Preliminary 3
  • II - The Playscript 25
  • Scene I 44
  • Scene II 52
  • III - The Stageplay 64
  • IV - The Play 93
  • V - The Drama 124
  • H.M.S. Pinafore or the Lass That Loved a Sailor 145
  • Part Two - The Plays 181
  • I - Antigone 185
  • Scene I 192
  • Scene II 197
  • Scene IV 202
  • Scene V 206
  • II - Othello 221
  • Act One 224
  • Scene III - The Council Chamber. 229
  • Act Two 232
  • Scene II - A Street. 242
  • Act Three 251
  • Scene II - A Room in the Citadel. 261
  • Scene IV - Before the Citadel. 263
  • Act Four 276
  • Scene II - A Room in the Citadel. 282
  • Scene III - State Bedroom in the Citadel. 290
  • Act Five 297
  • III - The Ridiculous PræCieuses 320
  • Scene I - La Grange, Du Croisy 323
  • Scene IV - Madelon, Cathos, Gorgibus. 324
  • Scene V - Cathos, Madelon. 325
  • Scene VII - Mascarille, Two Chairmen. 327
  • Scene VIII - Marotte, Mascarillie. 328
  • Scene X - Cathos, Madelon, Mascarille, Marotte. 330
  • Scene XI - Cathos, Madelon, Jodelet, Mascarille, Marotte, Almanzor. 334
  • Scene XII - Lucile, CéLimène, Cathos, Madelon, Mascarille, Jodelet, Marotte, Almanzor, and Fiddlers. 335
  • Scene XIII - Du Croisy, la Grange, Cathos, Madelon, Lucile, CéLimène, Jodelet, Mascarille, Marotte, and Fiddlers. 337
  • Scene XVI - Madelon, Cathos, Jodelet, Mascarille, and Fiddlers. 338
  • Scene. XVIII - Gorgibus, Madelon, Cathos, and Fiddlers. 339
  • IV - Hedda Gabler 344
  • Act Two 347
  • Act Three 370
  • Act Four 390
  • V - Candida 420
  • Act I 423
  • Act II 445
  • VI: Life with Father - A Period Comedy by Lindsay and Crouse 482
  • Act One 485
  • Scene II 503
  • Scene II 517
  • Act Three 548
  • VII - The Glass Menagerie 569
  • Scene 1 572
  • Scene 2 578
  • Scene 3 583
  • Scene 5 587
  • Scene 6 594
  • Scene 7 601
  • VIII - The Crucible 636
  • Act One - (An Overture) 639
  • Act Two 663
  • Act Four 683
  • Appendix 731
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