Recent Discoveries Attributed to Early Man in America

By Ales Hrdlicka | Go to book overview

THE LA BREA SKELETON, CALIFORNIA

In the early part of 1914 newspapers of the United States gave wide publicity to the discovery of human bones in an asphalt pit on the Rancho La Brea, near Los Angeles, Cal. Though details were withheld, it soon became known that such a find had actually been made; and as the La Brea pits were already known as the most valuable deposits of skeletal remains of the Quaternary fauna of California, the occurrence of human bones in one of these pits was recognized as a matter of very considerable importance.

Fortunately the study of these remains and their association was early intrusted to one who commands the confidence of every American scholar in these lines, namely, Prof. John C. Merriam, of the University of California. On August 7, 1914, in Science, appeared his report, which shows the circumstances and scientific value of the find in their true perspective.1 The report is so concise and to the point that it is necessary to quote it almost bodily. It reads:

In January, 1914, the Museum of History, Science, and Art, of Los Angeles, being inconvenienced by heavy rains filling the pits already in process of excavation in the asphalt deposits at Rancho La Brea, began work at a new locality, which was designated as pit No. 10. Work was started at a point a short distance southwest of a large pit from which many remains of extinct animals had been obtained in previous years. The point at which excavation was initiated was marked by a seepage from which tar had poured out in comparatively recent time. The excavation of this locality showed the presence of two vents or chimneys filled with asphalt. The chimneys were each about 3 feet in diameter and both had contributed to a hard asphaltic layer, forming the surface of the ground at this point. At a depth of about 8 feet the chimneys opened into a large dome-shaped asphaltic mass not less than 8 feet in diameter and extending downward to an unknown depth.

Remains of many kinds of animals were obtained in both chimneys, but the most interesting discovery was the finding on February 5 of an upper jaw from a human skull, at a depth of a little more than 6 feet, in the northerly of the two chimneys. Careful investigation of this vent disclosed later almost the entire skull with other portions of the skeleton. The remains evidently belonged to one individual. The bones were found ranging in depth down to level of about 9 feet below the surface, and reaching almost to the point at which the chimney connected with the domelike reservoir below.

Realizing that this find might prove of exceptional scientific interest unusual precautions were taken in the excavations following the discovery of the human remains. Under the direction of Mr. Frank S. Daggett, director of the museum, and of Mr. L. E. Wyman, who had immediate charge of the work in the pits,

____________________
1
Preliminary Report on the Discovery of Human Remains in an Asphalt Deposit at Rancho La Brea, by Prof. John C. Merriam. Science, n. s. vol. XL, pp. 198-203, New York, Aug. 7, 1914.

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Recent Discoveries Attributed to Early Man in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Letter of Transmittal 3
  • Contents 5
  • Illustrations 7
  • Recent Discoveries Attributed to Early Man in America 9
  • The "Ancient Man of Cuzco," Peru 10
  • The la Brea Skeleton, California 17
  • The "Fossil" Man of Vero, Flortda 23
  • Addenda 61
  • Index 67
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 67

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.