19

THE BOYS were right about a spot of heavy work: it was just what I needed. A shower and a change put me in the pink. After lunch I could have enjoyed a nap, and I had rather planned to rest later in the afternoon. But a couple of hours on the woodpile had cleared my head after the strenuous discussion of the morning, and I was ready for more.

Castle had not yet turned up, and I recalled with some satisfaction that the credit value of piling wood had been slightly higher than his work with the girls. I decided to indulge myself in a private survey of the art of Walden Two. In addition to the Ladder gallery I had noticed many pictures in the lounges and reading rooms, some on a fairly ambitious scale. There were also many small sculptures. I had learned that most of the personal rooms contained pictures or sculptures on loan from a common collection.

My tour proved to be more convenient and in many ways more enjoyable than a visit to a museum. It was usually possible to draw up a chair if I wanted to spend any time on a particular work, and somehow I took additional pleasure from the fact that the rooms were lived in. Nothing seemed to be merely on display.

-154-

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Walden Two
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • 1 5
  • 2 12
  • 3 19
  • 4 27
  • 5 33
  • 6 40
  • 7 46
  • 8 51
  • 9 67
  • 10 75
  • 11 85
  • 12 95
  • 13 100
  • 14 104
  • 15 116
  • 16 129
  • 17 138
  • 18 149
  • 19 154
  • 20 158
  • 22 185
  • 23 192
  • 24 205
  • 25 211
  • 26 217
  • 27 222
  • 28 242
  • 29 251
  • 30 277
  • 31 280
  • 32 284
  • 33 294
  • 34 301
  • 35 304
  • 36 316
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