Studies in Communication: Contributed to the Communication Research Centre, University College, London

By A. J. Ayer; J. Z. Young et al. | Go to book overview

'COMMUNICATION THEORY' -- AND
HUMAN BEHAVIOUR

COLIN CHERRY

Henry Mark Pease Reader in Telecommunication at the Imperial College of Science and Technology

If mine were the privilege of choosing, from among the Immortals, a patron saint of Communication, I should undoubtedly ask for twins -- gemini, John Locke and David Hume. As contributions to scientific method, their views upon reality and of our knowledge and understanding of reality have been outstanding from amongst the philosophers, in their permanence and penetration. Of all fields of science this is most certainly true of our present study of Communication, for it was communication, in its broadest and deepest sense, which formed the core of their enquiry. Knowledge of the real world; its expression in language and signs; its communicability; its use within social and ethical systems. The problems which they pursued are those which today form the common interest of psychologists, physiologists, linguists, sociologists, anthropologists, mathematicians... and the mathematically-minded engineer. This common interest we call Communication has grown at a quite alarming pace during the past decade -- a growth fertilised by a concentrated dose of mathematics, called Communication Theory.

In his great Essay,* Locke divided all that can fall within the compass of human understanding into three. The first he called Physica ('the knowledge of things as they are... their constitutions, properties and operations'). The second, Practica ('the skill of right applying... which leads to happiness'). Finally, Semiotic (the 'doctrine of signs,... to consider the nature of signs the mind

____________________
*
Concerning Human Understanding ( 1689); see the last two pages of Book IV.
Φ+ν+ι+χ+ή, π+ρ+̑+κ+ρ+ṭ+κ+ή, ε+η+ω+ṛ+ι+χ+ή.

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Communication: Contributed to the Communication Research Centre, University College, London
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • What is Communication? 11
  • Communication in Biology 29
  • 'Communication Theory' -- and Human Behaviour 45
  • Communication in Economic Systems 69
  • The Influence of Language on Medicine 91
  • Interpretation of Visual Symbols in the Arts 109
  • Communication of Thought in Ancient Greece 125
  • The Experimental Study of Speech 147
  • Colloquial English and Communication 169
  • Appendix 181
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 182

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.