Asiatic Mythology: A Detailed Description and Explanation of the Mythologies of All the Great Nations of Asia

By J. Hackin; Clément Huart et al. | Go to book overview

Fig. 1. SUDHANA DROPS THE RING BY WHICH THE KING'S DAUGHTER WILL RECOGNIZE HIM Borobudur.

THE MYTHOLOGY OF INDO-CHINA AND JAVA

THE following pages will not be in any way concerned with the Annamite peoples, whose beliefs and traditions are attached to the civilization of China. I shall deal only with the regions which have been more or less strongly marked with the imprint of Hindu civilization, namely, the Khmer empire, which in the first centuries of the Christian era comprised almost the whole of the Indo-China peninsula, including a great part of the present Siam and Laos, and the kingdom of Champa, which corresponded very closely with the modern Annam. The heart of Indo-China, between the two zones of civilization--Chinese in the north and Hindu in the south--has always been barbarian and hostile to any foreign penetration, and is still not too well known. Here are aboriginal peoples, Jaraï, Sedang, Bahnar, Stieng, often described by Europeans under the general name of Moïs, among whom customs and traditions of a far distant past are still perpetuated. To the two rival and neighbouring peoples, the Khmers and Chams, I will add the inhabitants of the islands of the Dutch archipelago, the civilizing element in which came also from India, and whose centre is in Java and Sumatra.

These three peoples, whose monuments and sculpture are generally treated in histories of art as deriving direct from India, do as a matter of fact present an outward appearance of very close relationship. But it would be to some extent an exaggeration to represent them as Hindu colonies in which artistic forms only repeat prototypes from elsewhere, with some slight variations.

As a matter of fact, the word India, in the period when Java, Champa, and the Khmer territory saw the beginning of the full development of their civilization, did not denote a

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Asiatic Mythology: A Detailed Description and Explanation of the Mythologies of All the Great Nations of Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Translator's Note 7
  • Contents 9
  • Illustrations 17
  • Introduction 27
  • The Mythology of Persia 35
  • The Mythology of the KĀfirs 57
  • The Mythology of Buddhism in India 61
  • Brahmanic Mythology 100
  • The Mythology of Lamaism 147
  • The Mythology of Indo-China and Java 187
  • Buddhist Mythology in Central Asia 242
  • The Mythology of Modern China 252
  • The Mythology of Japan 385
  • Buddhist Mythology 412
  • Index 449
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