Classical Myths in English Literature

By Dan S. Norton; Peters Rushton | Go to book overview

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK

The material is arranged alphabetically, and the titles of the entries are printed in boldface capital letters--for example, APOLLO. There is a separate entry for each important character and situation and for some important places and things.

The entries are of two kinds: articles and cross references. If you look in the A's for Apollo, you will find a long article under his name. But if you look in the M's for Marpessa, you will find under her name a brief statement that she "chose for her lover the mortal Idas instead of the god APOLLO." This refers you to the article on Apollo. In every cross reference the title of the article to which you are referred is printed in lightface capital letters, as the title Apollo is in this example. You can find the story about Marpessa quickly by turning to the article on Apollo and running your eye down the pages until you find Marpessa's name printed in boldface capital and lower-case letters-Marpessa. Except that the common nouns are not capitalized, the title of every cross reference appears in this way in the article to which it refers. Usually a cross reference sends you to only one article, but occasionally to two or three.

For the god or mortal who has both Greek and Roman names, we use chiefly the Greek name. Therefore the article on the king of the gods, for example, is found under the name Zeus. But his Roman names are also given in the article (it opens "ZEUS (zo + o + ̄s), or Jupiter, or Jove . . ."), and in addition these Roman names appear in the J's as cross references to the article. In general, Greek names are used without being identified as Greek, whereas

-xiii-

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Classical Myths in English Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • How to Use This Book xiii
  • Greek Myth and the Poets 1
  • A 13
  • C 101
  • D 126
  • E 139
  • G 165
  • H 171
  • J 224
  • L 227
  • N 230
  • O 238
  • Q 322
  • S 322
  • T 326
  • U 348
  • X 408
  • Z 411
  • Literary References 425
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