Classical Myths in English Literature

By Dan S. Norton; Peters Rushton | Go to book overview

Z

ZEPHYRUS (zĕf'îrûs) is the west wind. See WINDS.

ZETES (zē'tēz) was one of the ARGONAUTS.

ZETHUS (zē'thûs) and his twin brother Amphion were regents of THEBES.

ZEUS (zo + o +0304s), or Jupiter, or Jove, is the son of Cronus and Rhea, and the supreme power of all the Olympian gods. Cronus, having been told that he would be supplanted by one of his children, swallowed each of them at its birth. By the time Zeus was born, Rhea was tired of losing offspring to her husband's digestive tract; so she gave Cronus a stone wrapped like a child and hid Zeus in the island of Crete on Mount Ida. There he was fed by the milk of a goat named Amalthea, while Rhea's servants, the Curetes, made a continual clatter with their weapons to prevent Cronus from hearing the young god's crying.

Zeus is said to have grown up in a single year. When he reached maturity, he turned to his grandmother Gaea for aid, and together they succeeded in making Cronus disgorge his five other children--Hades, Poseidon, Demeter, Hestia, and Hera. He also disgorged the stone he had swallowed in the mistaken idea that it was Zeus, and this Zeus placed at Delphi where it became a sacred treasure (see Omphalus under ORACLES). Zeus then with the support of his brother and sister gods overthrew his father and replaced him in control of the world. This usurpation led to a war with the other Titans, most of whom opposed Zeus (see TITANS). The Titans established themselves on Mount Othrys, and the gods of course held Mount Olympus. The war was waged inconclusively for a long time, until Zeus again turned

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Classical Myths in English Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • How to Use This Book xiii
  • Greek Myth and the Poets 1
  • A 13
  • C 101
  • D 126
  • E 139
  • G 165
  • H 171
  • J 224
  • L 227
  • N 230
  • O 238
  • Q 322
  • S 322
  • T 326
  • U 348
  • X 408
  • Z 411
  • Literary References 425
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