The Story of the Rhodesias and Nyasaland

By A. J. Hanna | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
The Nyasaland Protectorate

The history of Nyasaland in the first half of the twentieth century was comparatively uneventful, whether the comparison is made with what has occurred before and since in the same territory, or with the history of the Rhodesias or of the world as a whole during the same fifty years. Changes were indeed taking place, and cumulatively they were of great importance, but they were gradual and indeed for the most part depressingly slow.

The repercussions of the two World Wars were, it is true, felt even in the heart of tropical Africa: particularly those of the first, when Nyasaland had a common frontier both by land and lake with enemy-held territory. The largest vessel on Lake Nyasa was the German Hermann von Wissmann, and its presence was regarded as a dangerous threat to the whole British position in the Protectorate. But before it was ready for action it was attacked and disabled by H.M.S. Gwendolen, one of the small gunboats which, although originally under the direct control of the Admiralty, had since 1895 been part of the Protectorate's own armed forces. Thus from the beginning of the war Britain had command of the lake, and when the Hermann von Wissmann was refloated in March 1918, it was renamed the King George.

On the night of 8th September 1914 a German force attempting to penetrate southwards attacked Karonga, but on the following morning the place was relieved, and the enemy was defeated and driven back across the River Songwe, which formed the frontier. From then on the Germans were on the defensive, since they had to face an invasion from Kenya. In

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The Story of the Rhodesias and Nyasaland
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 7
  • Contents 9
  • Illustrations 11
  • Preface 13
  • Chapter 1 - The Country 17
  • Chapter 2 - A Hundred Years Ago 23
  • Chapter 3 - Christianity and Commerce 41
  • Chapter 4 - Right of Conquest 72
  • Chapter 5 - The Queen's Protection 96
  • Chapter 6 - The Rhodesias Under Company Rule 136
  • Chapter 7 - European Progress and 'Native Policy' 169
  • Chapter 8 - The Nyasaland Protectorate 203
  • Chapter 9 - The Africans' Response 219
  • Chapter 10 - Federation 243
  • Appendix 279
  • Bibliography 280
  • Index 284
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