The International Court of Justice: Its Role in the Maintenance of International Peace and Security

By Oliver J. Lissitzyn | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

I gladly comply with the invitation of the President of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace to contribute a Foreword to this scholarly and timely monograph by Professor Lissitzyn on the International Court of Justice. For it is desirable that the work of the Court and its place in orounised international society should be studied as a whole, and not only in relation to particular disputes or problems, however important. It is only then that we may hope to gain the proper perspective for assessing both the achievements of the Court and the scope of possible improvements in its constitutional structure and its methods. Such improvements are a legitimate subject of study and discussion notwithstanding the fact that as in the case of its predecessor -- the Permanent Court of International Justice -- the results of the first five years of the existence of the International Court of Justice have not only vindicated the expectations attached to its establishment at the end of the Second World War. They have exceeded it. In the first two years of the activity of the Court, the scarcity of cases submitted to it tended to create some embarrassment and prompted search for remote analogies of a similar predicament such as that of the Supreme Court of the United States which in the first decade after its establishment had a somewhat nominal existence. Yet, barely within five years of its creation, the number of cases inscribed on the list of the International Court of Justice suggests that the time may be near when the accumulation of business will render topical the question of the adaptation of the machinery of the Court to the rapid expansion of its contentious and advisory jurisdiction.

The actual and anticipated volume of the business of the Court is not the only indication or explanation of its present status and stature. There are rather reasons which seem to

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The International Court of Justice: Its Role in the Maintenance of International Peace and Security
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Table of Contents *
  • I. Introduction 1
  • II- the Court and the Conditions Of International Peace 3
  • III- the Court and the Settlement Of Disputes 39
  • IV- the Court and the Enforcement Of Peace 103
  • Selected Bibliography 110
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 118

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.