Milton's Burden of Interpretation

By Dayton Haskin | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1. "A prologe shewinge the vse of the scripture," in William Tyndale's Five Books of Moses Called the Pentateuch, ed. J. I. Mombert ( 1884; rpt. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1967), pp. 12, 10 respectively.
2. The best account of reading for "experimental knowledge" remains Geoffrey Nuttall's The Holy Spirit in Puritan Faith and Experience ( 1946; rpt. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991).
3. Among the most prominent studies of Milton in this vein, see Robert L. Entzminger , Divine Word: Milton and the Redemption of Language ( Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 1985) and especially Georgia B. Christopher, Milton and the Science of the Saints ( Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1982). For a more "ecumenical" approach, see Michael Lieb, Poetics of the Holy: A Reading of Paradise Lost ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1981). For a judicious characterization of how the liberal humanist picture of Milton rendered his religious vision harmless, see Margarita Stocker, Paradise Lost ( Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press International, 1988), pp. 14-20.
4. GA, p. 43, where Bunyan is quoting Heb. 12: 16-17. I laid some groundwork for the present book in an earlier study of seventeenth-century searches for a "place": see Bunyan's Scriptural Acts, in Bunyan in Our Time, ed. Robert G. Collmer ( Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1989), pp. 61-92, 205-9.
5. Robert Darnton, "Toward a History of Reading," Princeton Alumni Weekly 87 ( 8 April 1987), pp. 20, 24. Christopher Hill book of 1977, Milton and the English Revolution (rpt. New York: Viking, 1978), represents an important turning point in its self-conscious attempt to place Milton in relation to contemporary English radicals.
6. Georgia B. Christopher, "The Verbal Gate to Paradise: Adam's 'Literary Experience' in Book X of Paradise Lost," PMLA 90 ( 1975): 69-77. The passages from Tyndale cited above were called to my attention in this article; see pp. 72-73.
7. Marshall Grossman, "Authors to Themselves": Milton and the Revelation of History ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987); quoted here from pp. 2 and ix.
8. Owen C. Watkins, The Puritan Experience ( London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1972); Charles Lloyd Cohen, God's Caress: The Psychology of Puritan Religious Experience ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1986).
9. For a fine study of the extraordinary range and diversity of uses to which biblical language was put in this era, see Nigel Smith, Perfection Proclaimed: Language and Literature in English Radical Religion 1640-1660 ( Oxford: Clarendon Press,

-241-

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