INDEX
Allies, diplomatic errors and apparently imperialistic purposes of, 2-3; opposition of Preaident Wilson to aims of, 3-4; course that might have been taken with, by America, 4-6; hesitating diplomacy of America concerning secret treaties of, 6-7; dangers of a victory to, 25-26; a real moral victory endangered by war aims of, 26-27; reasons for desire of America for victory of, 60; conferred nationalistic ambitions of, 98-99; both morale and military power of, weakened by engagements among themselves violative of internationalism, 107 n; disposition of conquered territories among, by terms of secret treaties, 115-120; specially objectionable character of secret treaties among, 119-120; bargain made by Italy with, 127- 128; course pursued by, regarding New Russia's appeal for peace without indemnities and annexations, 176-177.
America, lost opportunities of, for declaration of principles in world conflict, 1-7; reasons to be found for course of, 7-8; diminution of moral value of participation of, in war, 8; false position occupied by, 8- 9; discouraging effect of lack of courage of convictions by, 9-10; chief hope of the world's peace found in, 33-34; lessons concerning peace learned by, 34-36; mood in which problem of world peace must be approached by, 37; ideals of people of, before and after entering war, 38; pacifists, patriots, and the policy of neutrality in, 38-49; reasons for conversion of, to war, 50 ff; effect of modern growth of industry upon entrance into war, 57-62; theory of responsibility of financial interests for war, 62-66; idealistic factors influencing decision. 66- 67; influence of Russian Revolution, 67-68; obsolescent belief still prevalent that America has little concern with Europe, 68-70; war justified by appeal to old ideals of, 70- 71; forced to admit menace of German militarism, 84-85; democratic ideal of, menaced by German autocracy and militarism. 85-90; not bound by Italy's bargain with the Allies, 131-138; position of, as arbitrator between claims of her Allies and of her enemies, 139 ff.; President Wilson's statement of peace terms, 139-141; difference between position of, and that of Russia and British Labour Party, 142; strategic position of, 143- 145; necessity of going against will both of enemies and of

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