Vital Energetics: A Study in Comparative Basal Metabolism

By Francis G. Benedict | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
PAGE
Introduction3
Physical conditions prerequisite for comparable measurements of heat production8
Body or cell temperature8
Repose or absence of muscular activity12
Daily activities12
Time of day15
Deep sleep15
Body position17
Use of a hypnotic to eliminate muscular activity18
Huddling18
Absence of digestive activity18
Environmental temperature19
Reaction to 16° C.20
Period of adaptation20
Habitat temperature21
Emotion21
Sex factors22
Menstruation and oestrus cycle22
Lactation and pregnancy23
Males versus females23
Captive versus wild animals and man's influence23
Light per se24
Lability in basal metabolism25
Nutritive condition26
Age26
Summary of standard physiological conditions for comparable measurements27
Technical conditions for comparable measurements of heat production29
Instrumental technique29
Length of period of observation32
Consideration of heat loss36
Selection of metabolism data for comparative purposes38
Bases for presenting metabolism data39
Time basis39
Bases for comparisons of animals of different sizes within the same species40
Heat production per unit of weight (kilogram or average adult size)40
Total heat production plotted with reference to individual weights42
Factors affecting body weight43
External metabolically inactive components of body weight43
Internal factors45
Material physiologically inert (ballast or fill)45
Body composition46
Body fat46
Factor possibly compensating for metabolically inert weight48
General conclusion as to internal and external factors pertaining to "inert" body weight in animals of the same species48
Other bases for intraspecific comparisons49
Bases for comparisons of animals of different species49
Significance of metabolically inert body weight49
Surface area50
Actual measurements of surface area51
Graphic method of presenting the metabolism data55
Correlation of size with total heat production56

-iii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Vital Energetics: A Study in Comparative Basal Metabolism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.