Recollections of the Civil War: With the Leaders at Washington and in the Field in the Sixties

By Charles A. Dana | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X. .
CHATTANOOGA AND MISSIONARY RIDGE

Thomas succeeds Rosecrans in the Army of the Cumberland -- Grant supreme at Chattanooga -- A visit to the army at Knoxville -- A Tennessee Unionist's family -- Impressions of Burnside -- Grant against Bragg at Chattanooga -- The most spectacular fighting of the war -- Watching the first day's battle -- With Sherman the second day -- The moonlight fight on Lookout Mountain -- Sheridan's whisky flask -- The third day's victory and the glorious spectacle it afforded -- The relief of General Burnside.

WITH Grant I left Nashville for the front on the morning of the 21St. We arrived safe in Bridgeport in the evening. The next morning, October 22d, we left on horseback for Chattanooga by way of Jasper and Walden's Ridge. The roads were in such a condition that it was impossible for Grant, who was on crutches from an injury to his leg received by the fall of a horse in New Orleans some time before, to make the whole distance of fifty-five miles in one day, so I pushed on ahead, running the rebel picket lines, and reaching Chattanooga in the evening in company with Colonel Wilson, Grant's inspector general.

The next morning I went to see General Thomas; it was not an official visit, but a friendly one, such a visit as I very often made on the generals. When we had shaken hands, he said: Mr. Dana, you have got me this time; but there

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