Rendezvous at the Alamo: Highlights in the Lives of Bowie, Crockett, and Travis

By Virgil E. Baugh | Go to book overview

chapter
2

To the Creek Indian War

CROCKETT HAD obtained his first rifle some time before his move to Duck River and, roaming through the woods hunting game to supply his table as all men did in those days, he had already become a fine shot. A local shooting match was held with a beef as the prize. He entered and won it, as he did many others in later years.

But he was never contented with domestic life, being essentially a man of action. The Creek war, which began with the butchery of thirty-six whites at Fort Mimms in August 1813, gave him the twin spurs of duty and necessity to break away. He volunteered for service in a company captained by Francis Jones, later a congressman from Tennessee, and took part in the long and bloody struggle against the Creeks that followed. It was a badly managed campaign from the start, and it gave Crockett his initiation into Indian fighting.

Winchester, not far from Crockett's cabin, was the place of muster, and before long a company of ninety men had assembled there. After roll call they went into camp at Beaty's Spring and remained there for two days waiting for more volunteers, who soon collected to the number of twelve hundred. They were divided into two regiments, and the whole campaign was under command of Gen. Andrew Jackson.

Captain Jones assigned Crockett to scout duty because of his knowledge of woodcraft and set him the task of finding out the position of the Creeks. Davy selected George Russell, another young fellow and the son of Maj. William Russell, as his companion. There were twelve spies altogether, commanded by a Maj. John H. Gibson.

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