Rendezvous at the Alamo: Highlights in the Lives of Bowie, Crockett, and Travis

By Virgil E. Baugh | Go to book overview

chapter 3
Davy Goes into Politics

NOT LONG after the close of the Creek War Davy returned home to find that, under the burden of farm work, his wife "Polly" had taken sick and was on the point of death. Nor did her health improve under his care. She grew worse and died in the summer of 1815, when he had been home only two months. He was lonely and hard put to it to adjust himself to this loss until he persuaded one of his married brothers to come and live with him.

Davy remained single for some time, but presently he fell in love with Elizabeth Patton, a widow who lived nearby. She had two children of her own, but this was not as much a barrier to the progress of his courtship as was his own bashfulness. Plucking up courage, however, he at last proposed, and she accepted him. With his second wife he also acquired a well-stocked farm and a good home. But, as before, he soon became restless. Before long he moved with several neighboring farmers to the Shoal Creek country.

Shoal Creek may have had its attractions, but law and order were not among them. So many bad characters and outlaws had drifted into that part of the country that no one was safe. At last some aroused citizens got together and appointed magistrates and constables to keep order. They chose Crockett as one of the magistrates. These officials were given power to make arrests and to punish offenders, although they were without the benefit of written laws or statutes. This arrangement suited Davy down to the ground because he could hardly write his own name, and he confessed he "had never read a page in a law book" in his life. The whole procedure was based on "natural born sense," which

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