Succeeding at Jewish Education: How One Synagogue Made it Work

By Joseph Reimer | Go to book overview

Notes
Chapter 1: The Educating Synagogue
1. Mordechai M. Kaplan, Judaism as a Civilization: Toward a Reconstruction of American-Jewish Life ( New York: Schocken Books, 1967 [originally 1934 ]).
2. For a cross-cultural perspective on Jewish education, see H. S. Himmelfarb and S. DellaPergola, eds., Jewish Education Worldwide: Cross-Cultural Perspectives ( Lanham, Md.: University Press of America, 1989). For the unique role of the American synagogue, see Barry Chazan, Education in the Synagogue: The Transformation of the Supplementary School in Jack Wertheimer, ed., The American Synagogue: A Sanctuary Transformed ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987).
3. Scholarly reviews include: Harold S. Himmelfarb, "The Non-Linear Impact of Schooling: Comparing Different Types and Amounts of Jewish Education," Sociology of Education 42 ( April 1977): 114-29; Geoffrey S. Bock, "Does Jewish Education Matter?" Jewish Education and Jewish Identity ( New York: American Jewish Committee, 1977); Board of Jewish Education of Greater New York, Jewish Supplementary Schooling: An Educational System in Need of Change ( New York: Board of Jewish Education, 1988); David Schoem, Ethnic Survival In America: An Ethnography of a Jewish Afternoon School ( Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1989).
4. Jack Wertheimer, A People Divided: Judaism in Contemporary America ( New York: Basic Books, 1993): 43-65.
5. Steven M. Cohen, American Assimilation or Jewish Renewal ( Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 1988). Cohen was the first social scientist to suggest that attending synagogue schools could have a positive relation to adult Jewish commitment.
6. Gary A. Tobin and Gabriel Berger, Synagogue Affiliation: Implications for the 1990's, Research Report 9 ( Waltham, Mass: Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies, 1993): 13.
7. An outstanding example of this focus is evident in Jewish Supplementary Schooling: An Educational System in Need of Change cited in note 3 above.
8. Schoem, op. cit., 29.
9. Wertheimer, 49-51. Also see Sidney Goldstein, "Profile of American Jewry: Insights from the National Jewish Population Survey," American Jewish Yearbook ( New York: American Jewish Committee, 1992): 77-173.

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Succeeding at Jewish Education: How One Synagogue Made it Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Chapter 1 - The Educating Synagogue 1
  • Chapter 2 - Educating the Adults 29
  • Chapter 3 - The Temple Akiba School 71
  • Chapter 4 - A Close Look At Classroom Learning 101
  • Chapter 5 - The "Mandatory Hebrew" Controversy 133
  • Chapter 6 - Synagogue Drama And Education 163
  • Notes 187
  • Glossary 199
  • Selected Bibliography 201
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