The Revival of 1857-58: Interpreting an American Religious Awakening

By Kathryn Teresa Long | Go to book overview

Appendix A
Chronology of Selected Dates and Events

AS THE TEXT makes clear, mapping the origin and development of the Revival of 1857-58 is a difficult task, complicated by the nature of the revival as a popular, mass movement and by competing interpretive claims. The following is a list of selected dates and events mentioned in different chapters of this book, designed to clarify and to provide a sense of broad trends. It is not intended as a complete chronology of the revival; among other things, for example, the list does not trace the spread of revivals on college campuses or provide a complete chronology of noon prayer meetings. Events noted between 1850 and 1857 as precursors to the revival were those indicated by the primary sources listed in chapters 1 and 2. Readers interested in efforts to provide a more comprehensive compilation of revival activities should consult the books and newspapers cited in those chapters, as well as the secondary works referred to in the introduction.

Before 1857
1850- Ongoing weekday "union" prayer
meeting in Boston's Old South Church.
December 30, 1855-c. late spring 1856 Local revival in Rochester, New York,
in response to the preaching of Charles
Finney; morning "union" prayer meet-
ings held in participating churches on
a rotating basis; Elizabeth Finney or-
ganized women's prayer meetings at
3:00 PM daily.
September 1856-summer 1857 New York City YMCA sponsored a
noon prayer meeting, daily, then three
times a week until early summer, at

-137-

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