The Removal of the Cherokee Nation: Manifest Destiny or National Dishonor?

By Louis Filler; Allen Guttmann | Go to book overview

Andrew Jackson:


THE CONDITION AND ULTERIOR DESTINY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES (DECEMBER 8,1829)

We speak often of "Jacksonian" America, and in so doing we acknowledge the hero of the Battle of New Orleans as one of the most important leaders of his time. Andrew Jackson was, as John William Ward has suggested in a book on the subject, a symbol even to his contemporaries.1 Old Hickory entered the White House as the champion of the "common man." His eviction of the learned and scholarly John Quincy Adams meant, to mournful New Englanders and to jubilant frontiersmen, that the West had come of age. It meant also a new impetus to the drive for the removal of the Indians then dwelling within the borders of the States. Jackson argued that he was furthering traditional policies, but his emphases and his attitudes reveal discontinuities as well as continuities. It was, moreover, not easy to say just what these traditional policies were.

Although the Continental Congress had recognized the importance of Indian policy and had, by the Act of July 12, 1775, divided the country into "departments" and appointed "commissioners," our national policy was first set forth by Henry Knox, George Washington's Secretary of War. Knox, in a message to the president, urged that Congress purchase western lands from the Indians and remove the tribes before allotting the lands to settlers.2 From Washington's administration to Jackson's, American presidents followed this course. Knox had also argued that, "instead of exterminating a part of the human race," we should have devoted ourselves to imparting "our knowledge of cultivation and the arts to the aboriginals of the country. . . ."3Thomas Jefferson spoke in his first Annual Message of "the continued efforts to introduce among [the Indians] the implements and the practice of husbandry and of the household arts . . . ,"4 and Jef

____________________
1
See John William Ward, Andrew Jackson: Symbol for an Age ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1955).
2
American State Papers: Indian Affairs, I, 52-54.
3
Ibid., p. 53.
4
J. D. Richardson, ed., Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents: 1789-1897, I, 326.

-14-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Removal of the Cherokee Nation: Manifest Destiny or National Dishonor?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 118

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.