Ancient Greece: A Political, Social, and Cultural History

By Sarah B. Pomeroy; Stanley M. Burstein et al. | Go to book overview

Gagarin, Michael and Paul Woodruff, eds. 1995. Encomium of Helen, in Early Greek Political Thought from Homer to the Sophists. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Grene, David. 1987. The History: Herodotus. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Hamilton, Walter. 1951. Plato: The Symposium. Harmondsworth, England: Penguin.

Hanson, Ann. 1975. "Hippocrates: Diseases o Women" in Signs 1.

Pomeroy, Sarah B. 1994. Xenophon: Oeconomicus, A Social and Historical Commentary. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Warner, Rex. 1959. Medea, from The Complete Greek Tragedies, Euripides I: Four Tragedies, David Grene and Richmond Lattimore, eds. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.


SUGGESTED READINGS

Guthrie, W. K. C. 1971. The Sophists. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press. A brilliant study of the issues regarding the sophistic movement, excerpted from the author's three-volume History of Greek Philosophy.

Harris, William V. 1989. Ancient Literacy. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. A survey of the evidence for literacy and the lack of it in ancient Greece and Rome.

Hill, Ida Thallon. 1953. The Ancient City of Athens: Its Topography and Monuments. London: Methuen. A clearly written description with illustrations and plans of the architectural and sculpted antiquities at Athens, before the restorations that are now in progress began masking many of the major monuments.

Kagan, Donald. 1969. The Outbreak of the Peloponnesian War. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press. The first installment in Kagan's four-volume history of the war.

Osborne, Robin. 1987. Classical Landscape with Figures: The Ancient Greek City and Its Countryside. London: G. Philip. An illustrated discussion of life in rural Greece, natural flora and agriculture, written by an author who plainly loves his subject.

McGregor, Malcolm. 1987. The Athenians and Their Empire. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press. A history of the Athenians' dealings with their allies that takes a sympathetic view of imperialism.

Ste. G. E. M. de Croix 1972. The Origins of the Peloponnesian War. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press. An analysis of the available sources and an intensive study of the data concerning the Megarian decrees.

Vlastos, Gregory. 1991. Socrates: Ironist and Moral Philosopher. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press. An attempt to capture the essence of the philosopher, by one of the foremost students of the Platonic dialogues.

Wycherley, R. E. 1979. The Stones of Athens. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. A detailed study of what the physical remains of Athens have to tell us about the city.

-286-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ancient Greece: A Political, Social, and Cultural History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 514

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    New feature

    It is estimated that 1 in 10 people have dyslexia, and in an effort to make Questia easier to use for those people, we have added a new choice of font to the Reader. That font is called OpenDyslexic, and has been designed to help with some of the symptoms of dyslexia. For more information on this font, please visit OpenDyslexic.org.

    To use OpenDyslexic, choose it from the Typeface list in Font settings.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.