The Removal of the Cherokee Nation: Manifest Destiny or National Dishonor?

By Louis Filler; Allen Guttmann | Go to book overview

RESOLUTION AND STATEMENTS OF THE MISSIONARIES

Although the appeals of the Cherokees had thus far been in vain, the missionaries then working among the tribe decided to brave the wrath of the State of Georgia. They gathered at New Echota, the Cherokee capital, and made public ( December 29, 1830) their view of the controversy.

AT a meeting held at New Echota, December 29th, 1830, the following persons were present:

Rev. Daniel S. Butrick, Rev. Wm. Chamberlin, Rev. Wm. Potter, Rev. S. A. Worcester, Rev. John Thompson, Missionaries of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions.

Mr. Isaac Proctor, Doct. Elizur Butler, Mr. John C. Elsworth, Mr. Wm. Holland, Assistant missionaries of the A.B.C.F.M.

Rev. Gottlieb Byhan, Rev. H. G. Clauder, Missionaries of the U. Brethren's Church.

Rev. Evan Jones, Missionary of the American Baptist Board of Foreign Missions

Daniel S. Butrick was chosen chairman of the meeting, and S. A. Worcester secretary.

The meeting was opened with prayer by the chairman.

After deliberate consultation, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted, and ordered to be presented for publication to the editor of the Cherokee Phoenix.

Resolved, That we view the Indian Question, at present so much agitated in the United States, as being not merely of a political, but of a moral nature-- inasmuch as it involves the maintenance or violation of the faith of our country --and as demanding, therefore, the most serious consideration of all American citizens, not only as patriots, but as Christians.

Resolved, That we regard the present crisis of affairs, relating to the Cherokee nation, as calling for the sympathies, and prayers, and aid, of all benevolent people throughout the United States.

Resolved, That the frequent insinuations, which have been publicly made, that missionaries have used an influence in directing the political affairs of this nation, demand from us an explicit and public disavowal of the charge; and that we therefore solemnly affirm, that in regard to ourselves at least, every such insinuation is entirely unfounded.

Resolved, That, while we distinctly aver that it is not any influence of ours, which has brought the Cherokees to the

____________________
From The Missionary Herald, XXVII ( March, 1831), pp. 80-84.

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Removal of the Cherokee Nation: Manifest Destiny or National Dishonor?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 118

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.