The Removal of the Cherokee Nation: Manifest Destiny or National Dishonor?

By Louis Filler; Allen Guttmann | Go to book overview

Suggestions for Additional Reading

The "Jacksonian Era" is almost entirely different from the "Era of Reform," though they bear the same dates. The former was expeditious, for the most part, and respectful of the attitudes of its slaveholding, Irish, and other supporters. The latter was moral and humanitarian, as in its temperance and abolitionist concerns. Both are seen best in the common frame of the multi- volumed histories of the period, especially John Bach MacMaster History of the People of the United States, especially Volumes Six and Seven ( New York, 1906, 1910), which treat numerous movements and events, including the Cherokee controversy, with vivid detail.

There is a large bibliography of writ­ ings on both Andrew Jackson and John Marshall. John Spencer Bassett two- volume Life of Andrew Jackson ( Garden City, 1911) and Marquis James' Andrew Jackson: Portrait of a President ( Indianapolis, 1937) remain the most useful; William MacDonald, Jacksonian Democracy, 1828- 1837 ( New York, 1906) strives to be fair to Jackson, but concedes the illogical nature of his Indian policy. Albert J. Beveridge four- volume Life of John Marshall ( Boston, 1919) is one of the most famous of all American biographies. James A. Servies, ed., A Bibliography of John Marshall ( Washington, 1956), was prepared for his Bicentennial, and is indexed for ready use. Edward S. Corwin John Marshall and the Constitution ( New Haven, 1919) is short, but both readable and authoritative. Richard Longaker, "Andrew Jackson and the Judiciary," Political Science Quarterly, LXXXI ( 1956), 341-364, emphasizes that Jackson opposed Marshall, not, as popularly supposed, the Supreme Court.

Of the numerous histories of the State of Georgia, E. Merton Coulter Georgia, a Short History ( Chapel Hill, 1933) is most readily available. Ulrich Bonnell Phillips ' Georgia and State Rights ( Washington, 1902) is a balanced and scholarly study of Georgia from the Revolution to the Civil War. The emphasis is on Georgia's relations with the Federal Government. Students seeking a more detailed study of the intricacies of state politics should consult Paul Murray, The Whig Party in Georgia, 1825- 1853 ( Chapel Hill, 1948). Milton Sydney Heath's Constructive Liberalism ( Cambridge, Mass., 1954) is rich in data pertaining to many aspects of economic life in Georgia from 1732 to 1860. Wilson Lumpkin's autobiography, The Removal of the Cherokees (2 vols., New York, 1907), is fascinating and filled with useful documents, but is not readily obtainable. Robert McPherson's brief biography of Lumpkin (and a defense of his policies) appears in Horace Montgomery's collection, Georgians in Profile ( Athens, Georgia, 1958), pp. 144-167. Studies of George R. Gilmer and of George M. Troup are quite unreliable: the standard works are Gilmer, Sketches of Some of the First Settlers of Upper Georgia, of the Cherokees, and the Author

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Removal of the Cherokee Nation: Manifest Destiny or National Dishonor?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 118

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.