The Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757

By James Fenimore Cooper; James Daugherty | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 26

"Bot. -- Let me play the lion too." Midsummer Night's Dream.

NOTWITHSTANDING the high resolution of Hawkeye, he fully comprehended all the difficulties and dangers he was about to incur. In his return to the camp, his acute and practised intellects were intently engaged in devising means to counteract a watchfulness and suspicion on the part of his enemies, that he knew were, in no degree, inferior to his own. Nothing but the color of his skin had saved the lives of Magua and the conjurer, who would have been the first victims sacrificed to his own security, had not the scout believed such an act, however congenial it might be to the nature of an Indian, utterly unworthy of one who boasted a descent from men that knew no cross of blood. Accordingly, he trusted to the withes and ligaments with which he

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The Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Introduction - How This Book Came to Be Written 5
  • Chapter I 11
  • Chapter 2 22
  • Chapter 3 33
  • Chapter 4 44
  • Chapter 5 54
  • Chapter 6 66
  • Chapter 7 79
  • Chapter 8 92
  • Chapter 9 103
  • Chapter 10 113
  • Chapter II 126
  • Chapter 12 141
  • Chapter 13 158
  • Chapter 14 170
  • Chapter 15 185
  • Chapter 16 197
  • Chapter 17 210
  • Chapter 18 226
  • Chapter 19 239
  • Chapter 20 253
  • Chapter 21 266
  • Chapter 22 278
  • Chapter 23 291
  • Chapter 24 306
  • Chapter 25 319
  • Chapter 26 333
  • Chapter 27 345
  • Chapter 28 356
  • Chapter 29 369
  • Chapter 30 384
  • Chapter 31 398
  • Chapter 32 408
  • Chapter 33 426
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