The Governance of Hawaii: A Study of Territorial Administration

By Robert M. C. Littler | Go to book overview

after the morning prayer to some good singer or dancer, and the legislators frequently join in the festivities and exercise their vocal and terpsichorean skill. At every session the members make it a point to take some entertaining trip, usually to very little purpose. Most likely the two houses will go to Molokai in a body and inspect the leper settlement; and to facilitate exact legislative observation, they take along the Royal Hawaiian Band of Honolulu.

It is difficult to evaluate the work of the legislature. People in Hawaii have often subjected it to ridicule; but that is only the local reaction to the general tendency to poke fun at lawmakers. The legislature of Hawaii is not particularly bad nor particularly good, and at its worst, like all legislative assemblies, is a necessary evil.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Powers of the legislature are outlined in the Organic Act, § 55. The rules of the houses are published in the front of the journals of the house and senate each session.

-106-

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The Governance of Hawaii: A Study of Territorial Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Stanford Books in World Politics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Table of Contents xv
  • 1- Chapter I the Islands of Hawaii 1
  • Bibliography 14
  • Chapter II- An Independent Nation 16
  • Bibliography 28
  • Chapter III- Hawaii and the Union 29
  • Bibliography 51
  • Chapter IV- The Plan of Government 53
  • Bibliography 63
  • Chapter V- Races and the Government 64
  • Bibliography 81
  • Chapter VI- Parties and Elections 82
  • Bibliography 94
  • Chapter VII- The Legislature 95
  • Bibliography 106
  • Chapter VIII- The Executive Branch 107
  • Bibliography 121
  • Chapter IX- Health and Welfare 122
  • Bibliography 131
  • Chapter X- Education 132
  • Bibliography 146
  • Chapter XI- Public Lands and Public Works 147
  • Bibliography 154
  • Chapter XII- Conservation, Agriculture, and Business 155
  • Bibliography 163
  • Chapter XIII- Finance 165
  • Bibliography 176
  • Chapter XIV- Law and Legal Administration 177
  • Bibliography 186
  • Chapter XV- Honolulu General Government 187
  • Bibliography 193
  • Bibliography 202
  • Chapter XVII- County Government 203
  • Bibliography 210
  • Chapter XVIII- Federal Government in Hawaii 211
  • Bibliography 217
  • Chapter XIX- An Appraisal 218
  • Bibliography 227
  • Appendix A- Hawaiian Pronunciation 229
  • Appendix B 231
  • Appendix C 232
  • Appendix D 235
  • Chapter Iii. the Executive 250
  • Index 273
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