The British Way to Recovery: Plans and Policies in Great Britain, Australia, and Canada

By Herbert Heaton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
THE BRITISH OLD DEAL

EARLY IN AUGUST, 1931, I CALLED IN NEW YORK ON THE secretary of a foundation that had given me a fellowship for a year's research work in England. He was worried by the contents of a cable which had just arrived, for it reported that another fellow, then in Germany, had lost all his money through the collapse of the Darmstadt Bank, and had nothing left for his return ticket. "How are you carrying your money?" I was asked. "Dollars and pounds," I replied, and it was unanimously agreed that I was perfectly safe, for nothing evil could happen to Britain, her banks, or her currency.

Ten days later we landed at Plymouth, in time to watch the worst phase of the economic blizzard sweep away one landmark after another. The Labor government fell, the gold standard ceased to stand. Free trade, the policy that had prevailed for over eighty years, vanished. Every evening we switched on the radio for the six o'clock "First News Bulletin," asking "What next?" and as we looked at the figures of unemployment or of the national deficit we wondered if this was the last twilight of a land that once had been the world's workshop, shipper, and banker.

When we left, a year later, most of our doubts had been dispelled. The country was regaining confidence, had emerged from the darkest hours, and was stepping

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The British Way to Recovery: Plans and Policies in Great Britain, Australia, and Canada
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.