History of New England - Vol. 1

By John Gorham Palfrey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII.

THE settlements north of Massachusetts, which last engaged our attention, were more or less connected with the Antinomian dispersion. The principal of those which had been made further towards the cast belonged as yet to Churchmen. David Thompson, who, under the auspices of John Mason, attempted a plantation at the mouth of the Piscataqua, soon became discouraged, and removed to an island in Boston harbor.1 A new patent having been solicited from the Council for New England2 by Gorges, Mason, and others, the enterprise was resumed, and a party of some fifty men was sent out to be employed in fishing, trade, salt-making, and farming, under the superintendence of Captain Walter Neal.3 He returned to England after about three years, and, the other partners having withdrawn themselves, the settlement fell into the hands of Mason, who reinforced it with a new supply of men and means, and gave it in charge to Francis Williams. Not. withstanding the judicious management of this agent, the undertaking still continued to be unprosperous. Mason made too free an outlay for stores, tools, arms, ammunition, and live stock, of the last of which he imported costly specimens from Denmark. His death put a sudden end to the measures on foot for retrieving his affairs in the plantation.

____________________
1
See above, pp. 205, 233.
2
The patent was the one dated November 3, 1631. See above, p. 398, note. Hubbard (215, 216) has preserved what he understood to be a copy of it.
3
See Letters of Ambrose Gibbons and others, in Farmer's edition of Belknap's New Hampshire, I. 422-432.

-522-

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History of New England - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. vii
  • List of Illustrations xviii
  • Contents - Of the First Volume. xix
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 51
  • Chapter III 101
  • Chapter IV 133
  • Chapter V 164
  • Chapter VI 198
  • Chapter VII 239
  • Chapter VIII 283
  • Chapter IX 331
  • Chapter X 383
  • Chapter XI 426
  • Chapter XII 471
  • Chapter XIII 522
  • Chapter XIV 560
  • Chapter XV 610
  • Appendix. 635
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