Hard Times for These Times

By Charles Dickens | Go to book overview

HARD TIMES
BOOK THE FIRST SOWING

CHAPTER I
THE ONE THING NEEDFUL

'NOW, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir!'

The scene was a plain, bare, monotonous vault of a schoolroom, and the speaker's square forefinger emphasised his observations by underscoring every sentence with a line on the school- master's sleeve. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's square wall of a forehead which had his eyebrows for its base while his eyes found commodious cellarage in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's mouth, which was wide, thin, and hard set. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's voice, which was inflexible, dry, and dictatorial. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum

-1-

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Hard Times for These Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Hard Times - Book the First Sowing 1
  • Chapter IV - Mr. Bounderby 7
  • Chapter V - The Key-Note 19
  • Chapter VII - Mrs. Sparsit 37
  • Chapter XI - No Way Out 56
  • Chapter XII - The Old Woman 61
  • Chapter XIII - Rachael 73
  • Chapter XV - Father and Daughter 80
  • Chapter XVI - Husband and Wife 85
  • Book the Second - Reaping 98
  • Chapter IV - Men and Brothers 123
  • Chapter VI - Fading Away 130
  • Chapter VII - Gunpowder 136
  • Chapter VIII - Explosion 147
  • Chapter IX Hearing the Last of It 159
  • Chapter X - Mrs. Sparsit's Staircase 171
  • Chapter XI - Lower and Lower 178
  • Chapter XII - Down 191
  • Book the Third - Garnering 196
  • Chapter II - Very Ridiculous 202
  • Chapter III - Very Decided 211
  • Chapter IV - Lost 219
  • Chapter VI - The Starlight 227
  • Chapter VII - Whelp-Hunting 245
  • Chapter IX - Final 255
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