Antislavery: The Crusade for Freedom in America

By Dwight Lowell Dumond | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
MIGRATIONS TO THE FREE STATES

One of the strangest aspects of the slavery controversy was the way in which the spokesmen of the slave power vehemently defended the institution of slavery as a positive good, denounced all programs for the amelioration of its harsher features, and at the same time, sometimes in the same breath, cast the blame on someone else. The slave was a slave because he had a black skin. He could not have an education or religious instruction because it would increase his desire for freedom. He could not be set free because someone in the North insisted he should be freed; it was the fault of the abolitionists that he was kept in slavery. People who spoke out against slavery and were mobbed, or hanged, or shot had only themselves to blame; they should have remained silent.

The idea that the South was turned away from emancipation, and toward a defense of slavery by the abolition movement of the North is a monstrous fiction. There was no recognizable North and South on the slavery question until the Black Belt was developed. We have seen that the leading opponents of slavery in the Constitutional Convention of 1787 were from Virginia, Maryland, and New York, all of them slave states, and that slavery was in process of gradual extinction in Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, and Pennsylvania until well past the turn of the century. There were men within the limits of slave states in the early years of the republic who were opposed to slavery and said so. Woolman, Benezet, Franklin, Mason, Rush, Hopkins, Webster, Jay, Dwight, Rice, Cooper, and McLeod all lived in slave states and helped to make them free.

No one of the people we have been talking about, however, came from Georgia or South Carolina. Men from those states spoke, if at all, in defense of slavery and in defiance of every critic. There never was tolerance of dissent or freedom of expression on the subject in proslavery circles, or where slaveholders dominated a community and controlled public opinion. Later on, they, and some historians, tried to blame their severity and uncompromising attitude on William Lloyd Garrison. Actually, of course, they did not become severe and uncompromising, they always had been that way. William Lloyd Garrison was a Johnny-come-lately in the business of abolishing slavery, and no one in the slave country ever defended slavery more violently than the spokesmen from the lower South before 1830.

Richard Furman, leader of the Southern Baptists, wrote a strong defense of slavery as a Christian institution in 1822. He insisted that discovery of the Charleston insurrection in 1822 was evidence of God's approval and protection of slaveholders, and he urged religious instruction for the slaves that they might be taught respect for their masters.1 Frederick Dalche, an Episcopal minister of Charleston, in 1823 urged religious instruction that the slaves might be indoctrinated with the place in society assigned to them by their Creator.2 William Barlow, rector of the Claremont Protestant Episcopal Church in Charleston, in 1826 urged the church to preach the acceptabil-

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Antislavery: The Crusade for Freedom in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.