Romance in the Latin Elegiac Poets

By Elizabeth Hazelton Haight | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

I HAD several reasons for writing this book. First of all I wished to interest the fabulous General Reader in the Latin elegiac poets of the Augustan Age. Vergil is still a

"Light among the vanish'd ages;
star that gildest yet this phantom shore";

"Horace still charms with graceful negligence,"

and "Venus clerk, Ovyde" compels lovers of painting and of poetry to go back to his Metamorphoses because of the vast influence which those stories had on literature and art. But who now reads Ovid Heroides and Ars Amatoria or the elegiacs of Tibullus and Propertius? Here is great poetry which is slipping back into the oblivion of the dark ages. And strangely enough it is the most modern love poetry of the ancient world. I had a hope that perhaps I might revivify these poets for youth and especially that I might interest students of poetry and romance in this past form of romantic lyrical expression.

A scholastic reason for my volume is that it presents an unexplored chapter in the History of Fiction. Of course it is now a truism that the novel though peculiarly of our times in its tremendous growth, has its roots far back in the Greek and Latin romances. Any history of fiction records that fact. But the story of the origins of the ancient romance has not been completely traced, especially for its Latin forms. The idea for this book came to me

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Romance in the Latin Elegiac Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents xi
  • I - What is "Romance"? 1
  • II - Greek Elegiac Poetry Before Gallus 8
  • III - The Elegies of Catullus 16
  • IV - Gallus 26
  • VII - Publius Ovidius Naso 125
  • VIII - The Latin Novel and the End Of Romance 220
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 239
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.