Far Eastern Governments and Politics: China and Japan

By Paul M. A. Linebarger; Djang Chu et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
The Coming of the Sea-Borne States

DYNAMIC though Japanese history was in the period before Western contacts, the world of Christendom was even more dynamic. While Japan moved from one kind of feudalism to another, developing meanwhile one of the world's most perfect examples of the police state, the nation-states of Europe sprang from the rich ruins of medieval Christendom and, for the first time in human history, made the "world" of their power politics co-terminus with the planet Earth.

The greatest change in all Japanese history came, as it has come sooner or later to every single Asian country, from the outside. Even in the mid- twentieth century it is still true that the West European peoples, together with their American, South African, and Australian offsprings, and their East European rivals, are the most dynamic of the human race. From the sixteenth century onward, change in Asia has been colored by the fact that the Western World first remotely and then proximately set the standards for change, if not for forward movement.

It would be an oversimplification to suggest that the native dynamism of Japanese history has disappeared, or to allow the inference that the only forces making for change in Japanese society are forces from the outside. Great though the Western impact may have been, and greater still the extraordinarily creative fusion of Japanese national character and the stimuli provided from the West, it would be an exaggeration to make the major factor into the exclusive one. It is wise therefore to preface any recitation of changes provided by the Western impact within Japanese government by a statement of what was happening to Tokugawa Japan at the very time that this impact took place.

____________________
1

A mature, reflective study of this central problem of intercultural penetration--with Japan chosen as the principal illustration--is offered by Sir George Sansom in his recent The Western World and Japan, cited.

-324-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Far Eastern Governments and Politics: China and Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 644

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.