Editors Make War: Southern Newspapers in the Secession Crisis

By Donald E. Reynolds | Go to book overview

VIII
The Great, Grand, Noble Deed is Done

THERE was hardly any suspense in South Carolina over whether the Palmetto State would secede. Even the most politically naïve citizen knew that his state would soon haul down the Stars and Stripes; the only question was when. The legislature, moving cautiously in order not to alienate the other slave states, originally had set the election of delegates to a secession convention for January 8, with the convention to meet one week later. So strong was the public demand for more expeditious action, however, that the legislature moved up the election to December 6 and the convening date to December 17. The convention met at Columbia on the appointed date but was delayed slightly when the threat of a smallpox epidemic caused the delegates to shift their deliberations to Charleston. There, on December 20, the convention voted unanimously to dissolve South Carolina's ties with the United States. The Charleston Mercury was so far from being surprised that it required only five minutes to get an "extra" on the streets announcing the momentous event.1

Ecstatically reporting their state's withdrawal from the

-161-

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Editors Make War: Southern Newspapers in the Secession Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 3
  • I - The Fire Will Glow Brighter and Brighter 12
  • II - Douglas and Anti-Douglas Ruined Every Thing 28
  • III - We Are Anxious to Holler For Somebody 52
  • IV - The Devil Quotes Scripture 76
  • V - By the Light Of The Texas Flames 97
  • VI - Prejudice Has Usurped The Place of Reason 118
  • VII - He Who Dallies Is a Dastard 139
  • VIII - The Great, Grand, Noble Deed is Done 161
  • IX - The Agony is Over 189
  • X - Newspapers and Telegraphs Have Ruined the Country 210
  • Appendix, Notes, Bibliography, Index 219
  • Appendix 221
  • Notes 231
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 289
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