Children Who Cannot Read: The Analysis of Reading Disabilities and the Use of Diagnostic Tests in the Instruction of Retarded Readers

By Marion Monroe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
TYPICAL INDIVIDUAL CHARTS SHOWING DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN READING AND OTHER ACCOMPLISHMENTS

In the preceding chapter we have pointed out the fact that children vary in reading achievement as compared with their other accomplishments. We have presented a method for measuring the discrepancy which may be used to determine the degree of retardation or acceleration in reading. In ananalysis of any individual's reading, it is helpful to portray his accomplishments graphically so that the relationships between them may be readily perceived. The grade scores on the series of tests which are described in the first chapter may be arranged in the form of an educational profile for each child, from which the observer can tell at a glance the high and low points of his achievements. We have selected a series of eighteen profiles which illustrate some of the types of variation which were encountered among the children studied. The charts show not only special talents and specific difficulties in reading but also different abilities in the various reading skills.

The charts were made by plotting the child's grade scores derived from the tests on the age-grade scale. The reading tests are designated by the following symbols: O, oral reading as measured by Gray's Oral Reading Paragraphs; C, comprehension of silent reading as measured by the Haggerty test in cases of less than third-grade reading achievement, or by the Monroe test in cases of more than third-grade reading achievement; W.A. for word analysis as measured by the Iota Word Test; and W.D. for word discrimination as measured by the Word-Discrimination Test.


EDUCATIONAL PROFILES OF CHILDREN OF SUPERIOR INTELLIGENCE

Case 1 (Fig. 2). -- Allen is a little boy who has unusual talent for reading. He was in the second grade at school when examined, although he was only

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