Philosophical Anthropology and Practical Politics

By F. S. C. Northrop | Go to book overview

12
Modern Ways in Medieval Societies

Medieval societies exist everywhere, even in the more modern nations. Many of the people who live in the small towns and farming areas of the Province of Quebec in Canada still think in terms of the religious and social beliefs and act according to the patriarchal familial customs of a medieval society. The same is true of most of the patriarchal families of the peasants who make up the villages of France. Any group of people are medieval if the covert or overt trapped impulses in their brains axe the epistemic correlates of the introspected elemental concepts of a medieval or ancient religion, science and philosophy. To be a Modern means to be guided in one's moral, legal, political and other decisions by the elemental concepts and propositions of either modern science and philosophy or Stoic Roman legal science when its substantive content is made consistent with its most basic, i.e., elementary, proposition. 1Chapter 18 will show why this is the case. Since the scientific, ethical, philosophical and religious theories of Asia, before it was influenced by the modern West, were formulated with respect to their most elementary concept of the person, in many cases as early as the seventh century B.C., Oriental societies are medieval and even ancient. The Elizabethan Christian theocratic England of Canterbury, the Crown and early seventeenth century Kent and Essex, as described and defended philosophically in Sir Robert Filmer Patriarcha, was also a medieval society and even an ancient law-of-patriarchal-status one. As noted previously, the contemporary English historian Mr. Peter Laslett has shown that the non-Jeffersonian component of the society of the Old South is the result of transferring to Virginia and the other Southern British colonies, by Sir Robert Filmer's own blood

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