Seldom Ask, Never Tell: Labor and Discourse in Appalachia

By Anita Puckett | Go to book overview

NOTE ON TRANSCRIPTION

Discourse transcribed for this work comes from approximately 180 hours of audiotaped speech occurring in routine, daily work and social conversational settings. As a generally spontaneous if not conversational set of data, it is most appropriately transcribed using methods developed in conversational analysis. I modified slightly the system developed by DuBois et al. ( 1993).

Ash Creek speech does conform, however, to features diagnostic of Appalachian English ( Shopen and Williams 1980; C. Williams 1992; Wolfram and Christian 1976; Wolfram and Schilling-Estes 1998). Therefore, problems related to transcribing a highly stigmatized variety of American English also arose. The problems are complicated by the long-standing existence of both stylized and misleading orthographic representations in regional and local color fictional writing and popularized distortions of "hillbilly talk" found in pamphlets obtainable at roadside tourist stops or in newspaper cartoons. These preexisting orthographic distortions have their own well established semiotic meanings in popular culture that evoke highly negative images of lazy, poor, ignorant, and intellectually challenged individuals. Certain orthographic features of these representations such as the use of the apostrophe to indicate an alleged letter omission or certain spellings such as "yeller" for "yellow" can carry some of these negative significations with them when used in a rigorous transcription such as I attempted here.

Using a dual transcriptional system in which a close phonetic transcription is paired with a standardized English orthographic rendition is also unsuitable. Such dualities recreate a sense of "Other" with respect to Ash Creek speech. Ash Creek speech is a variety of American English, not a separate language. Many words are pronounced in ways conforming to national newscasters' pronunciations of Standard Broadcast American English. Using this type of transcriptional system would exaggerate linguistic differences for little scholarly purpose while reproducing a widely accepted and weakly substantiated sense of significant cultural differences.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Seldom Ask, Never Tell: Labor and Discourse in Appalachia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.