Seldom Ask, Never Tell: Labor and Discourse in Appalachia

By Anita Puckett | Go to book overview

7
"HELPIN SOMEBODY OUT": IMPERATIVES IN TASK SITUATIONS

"Hey, Claude, hand me that rope."

I visited Cindy's place one afternoon, knowing that she was moving and that I was "needed" to help load the truck. Tom was there with his truck, helping to load and volunteering to drive his truck to the new place. Having greeted him, I asked what brought him here on a sunny afternoon. He replied, "Just hɛpin a neighbor out." [notes 7/86]

One summer afternoon, Susie related her daily activities to me as she usually did when we visited. In the narrative stream of events, she mentioned that she "swung by Mom's." She "needed help" with Matthew (a young grandson, not one of Susie's children). [notes 6/86]

CONTRARY TO POPULAR CULTURE STEREOTYPES, Ash Creek residents are generally laboring, or "doin somethin" during waking hours. Most children are socialized from five or six years old to activities that contribute to household maintenance. One's activities at any given time are likely to dominate "just talkin" exchanges. The metapragmatic functions created or reproduced in these conversations reassert a well-developed ideology of task-focused communication. A primitive component in constituting this ideology 1 is that "doin somethin" references a physical activity. The "sayin" "around here, honey, we work with our hands, not with our heads" describes one way individuals are likely to interpret and assign value to labor. Individuals are expected to be "keepin busy," even if it is simply turning the pages of a grocery store insert in a newspaper or waiting for hours to shoot unwanted groundhogs in a garden. This task-orientation is so well developed that performing some type of task often replaces other forms of recreational activity, such as reading or playing board games, which do not result in something "gIttin done."

-130-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Seldom Ask, Never Tell: Labor and Discourse in Appalachia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.