The True Story of Woodrow Wilson

By David Lawrence | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
PRESIDENT OF PRINCETON--RELATIONS WITH
GROVER CLEVELAND

Woodrow Wilson was at heart a rebel. Impatient of things as they were he did not advocate change for change sake. He was awed neither by the cumbersome processes of reform nor by the travail of evolution. Iconoclast he was not. With fierce logic and penetrating criticism he dissected the moldy political system of the day--it became the object of his wrath as a student of government in boyhood days. But invariably he offered a constructive alternative; he was not merely content to demolish; he was ambitious to build.

Whence came this boldness of expression and severity of criticism? In what background did the crusading spirit within Woodrow Wilson take root? Both heredity and environment played their part in shaping the character of Woodrow Wilson. His grandparents were Scotch-Irish. Joseph R. Wilson, born in Steubenville, Ohio, was a professor of rhetoric first and then became a Presbyterian clergyman. He married Janet Woodrow, daughter of Thomas Woodrow, also a Presbyterian clergyman. Their distinguished son, Thomas Woodrow Wilson, named in honor of the grandfather, was born on December 28, 1856, in the manse of the Presbyterian church in Staunton, Virginia. The family moved to Augusta, Georgia, in 1858, and subsequently to the theological seminary at Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. James Woodrow, a graduate of the University of Heidelberg, and a brother of the future President's mother, came to the seminary at Columbia where "he long tried in vain to reconcile dogmatic theology and natural science." The family circle was of the stern, precise, and religious temperament requiring morning and evening readings of the

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The True Story of Woodrow Wilson
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 370

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.