The True Story of Woodrow Wilson

By David Lawrence | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
MARRIAGE TO MRS. EDITH GALT; THE POLITICAL CAMPAIGN
OF 1916, AND RE-ELECTION.

The transition period in the life of Woodrow Wilson dates from the summer of 1914 when Mrs. Wilson died to the spring of 1915--the days of his acquaintance with Mrs. Edith Galt. Eight months of tomb-like seclusion in the White House changed the whole temper of the man. His moods in those months were so despondent that the members of his family groped in vain for something that would lift him from the depression into which he had languished. Public business he transacted with the same earnestness but without zeal, without ambition, without inspiration.

Two daughters had been married, his wife was dead. All his old friends were away from Washington. The President of the United States cannot make new friends as quickly as a private citizen. Mr. Wilson knew that if he drew to his side either the members of his Cabinet or Senators or Representatives they would surely talk to him about the problems of the day from which, mentally at least, he was seeking to escape. Dr. Cary T. Grayson was almost constantly with Mr. Wilson. The companionship of Professor Stockton Axson, a brother of Mrs. Wilson, was also sought by the President. Private Secretary Tumulty lived at the White House for several weeks while his family was away for the summer. Everything possible to divert Woodrow Wilson's mind from the sorrow which weighed upon him was done but his spirits never rose and the horizon seemed to grow darker and darker. At last Dr. Grayson, whose diagnosis of Mr. Wilson's dilemma was not merely that of an attendant physician interested in maintaining the health of the nation's

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