Israel's Defense Line: Her Friends and Foes in Washington

By I. L. Kenen | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Autobiography

Almost all my life has been committed to the cause of Israel's restoration and survival, a fortunate coincidence between occupation and commitment. I inherited legacies from my father, a life-long Zionist, and from my mother, a pioneer trade unionist. My father was born near Kiev, my mother near Bialystok. They both came to the United States in 1891, and to Canada in 1904.

My father's life story epitomized the tragic history of his generation. He fled from Czarist pogroms; he was a prisoner of the Communists; his settlement in Palestine was barred by Anglo-Arab policy and, residing in Europe, he perished soon after Nazis conquered the Warsaw ghetto.

Born in 1905, I organized the first Young Judea Club in Toronto in 1917 under the influence of Henrietta Szold, the founder of American Hadassah. Anna Raginsky, my sister, founded the first chapter of Canadian Hadassah.

At the University of Toronto I majored in philosophy, but I was attracted to journalism and joined The Toronto Star in 1925. I emigrated to Cleveland the following year, in the dubious perception that "Toronto the Good" was the city of the past and that Cleveland was the city of the future. I became the City Hall reporter, political writer, and State House correspondent for The Cleveland News.

A year later I married a childhood sweetheart, Beatrice Bain, a fellow student at the University of Toronto. She gave me 42 blessed years and shared my devotion to Zionism. For more than a quarter of a century, she was office manager of Hadassah's national convention staffs. Our greatest blessing was our son, Peter, now an international economist at Princeton. His wife, Regina, is a professor in the social sciences at Trenton State.

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Israel's Defense Line: Her Friends and Foes in Washington
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.