Untangling the Web: Applications of the Internet and Other Information Technologies to Higher Learning

By David J. McArthur; Matthew W. Lewis | Go to book overview

Chapter Four
CREATING CONNECTED EDUCATIONAL
COMMUNITIES

Chapters Two and Three consider how information technologies can contribute to two well-defined higher-education missions (delivering and creating instruction) and, in so doing, can address some major challenges that higher education now faces. But the preceding chapter discussed how the Internet, in particular, might play a much broader role: fostering electronic-learning communities. Not surprisingly, the potential effects of such communities on specific educational problems are much tougher to gauge than are those of more well-defined technologies, such as distance learning. For one thing, these communities often emerge spontaneously, rather than as part of a deliberate plan aimed at specific educational goals. Moreover, since Web-based groups are so new, it will be some time before, we see which key problems in higher education they might help solve, if any. And, if online communities do help improve educational outcomes, almost certainly they will do so not simply by reducing labor costs and increasing the productivity of traditional higher-educationdelivery systems, but by transforming learning and teaching practices.

In spite of these uncertainties, electronic-learning communities are worthy of attention, because, if they realize even a fraction of the benefits BioMedNet or the World Lecture Hall seem to promise, they will indeed make a substantial mark on higher education.

If you scan the WWW for online educational communities, it quickly becomes apparent that, however formative they may be, they are also ubiquitous. We have reviewed communities that conduct and publish research and share curricula; but others are appearing

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Untangling the Web: Applications of the Internet and Other Information Technologies to Higher Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 114

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.