Decolonization & Independence in Kenya, 1940-93

By B. A. Ogot; W. R. Ochieng | Go to book overview

in the country develops or heightens, leading to new authoritarian regimes. Kenya is at the crossroads now. It must re-create a shared normative order for the day-to-day renewal of trust in the promises of democracy if the populist-authoritarian cycle is to be broken. This entails the forging of new institutions and the restructuring of the socioeconomic system. And the fundamental question which must be raised is whether Kenya is any less neo-colonial economically, culturally and intellectually as a result of the reintroduction of the multiparty system. The economy is being managed according to the dictates of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). But for political stability to be sustained, free market policies alone are inadequate: a frontal attack on poverty is essential. Hence, there is a desperate need for more social policies aimed at fighting poverty.

Also, there is a need for mass participation in the political process. At the moment, the 'national conflict', embodied in the rivalries for the executive power among the élite in the various political parties, takes priority over 'social conflict', concerned with the interests of most of the inhabitants of the country. It is a democracy of the élite, for the élite and by the élite. This yawning chasm between the élite and the masses must be bridged.

Culturally and intellectually, the élite of all parties continue to compete for the favours of the West, whose leaders and thinkers act as the reference group, the originators of concepts, models and paradigms and the final Court of Appeal. A new 'civilizing mission' by the West has been launched in Africa.


Notes
1.
Weekly Review, 8 December 1990, pp. 6-7.
2.
Nairobi Law Monthly, 30 ( February 1991), 28.
4.
Nairobi Law Monthly, 35 ( August 1991), 16.
5.
Weekly Review, 6 December 1991, p. 7.
7.
Nairobi Law Monthly, 40 ( January 1992), pp. 17-18.
8.
Weekend Mail, 18 February 1993, p. 24.
9.
Kenya Times, 28 August 1992, pp. 1-2.
10.
Society, 28 September 1992, p. 14.
11.
Sunday Nation, 28 February 1993, p. 10.
13.
Sunday Nation, Nairobi, 26 September 1993, p. 10.
15.
Kwenqo Opanga, Sunday Nation, 26 September 1993, pp. 10-11.
16.
Weekly Review, 17 September 1993.
17.
Weekly Review, 20 August 1993, p. 3.
18.
Standard, 4 October 1993, p. 2.
19.
Weekly Review, Nairobi, 13 August 1993, p. 5.

-260-

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Decolonization & Independence in Kenya, 1940-93
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Contributors viii
  • Prologue on Decolonization xi
  • Notes xvii
  • Introduction the Invention of Kenya 1
  • Note 3
  • Part One the Decolonization of Kenya 1945-63 5
  • One Decolonization: A Theoretical Perspective 7
  • Conclusion 21
  • Notes 22
  • Two the Formative Years 1945-55 25
  • Conclusion: Towards an Alternative Future 43
  • Bibliography 44
  • Three: The Decisive Years 1956-63 48
  • Part Two the Kenyatta Era 1963-78 81
  • Four Structural & Political Changes 83
  • Conclusion 106
  • Appendix: Constitutional Amendments Under Kenyatta 107
  • Notes 108
  • Five - Social & Cultural Changes 110
  • Conclusion 143
  • Notes 144
  • Part Three the First Nyayo Decade 1978-88 149
  • Six the Economics of Structural Adjustment 151
  • Conclusion 182
  • Notes 183
  • Seven the Politics of Populism 187
  • Notes 213
  • Eight the Construction of a National Culture 214
  • Part Four Epilogue 1989-93 237
  • Nine Transition from Single-Party to Multiparty Political System 1989-93 239
  • Conclusion 259
  • Notes 260
  • Index 262
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