Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined

By Victor A. Kramer; Robert A. Russ | Go to book overview

A PORTFOLIO OF HARLEM RENAISSANCE PHOTOGRAPHS

VICTOR A. KRAMER

These twelve photographs, selected from the Harold Jackman Countee Cullen Memorial Collection, housed within the archives of Atlanta University, represent many aspects of that era sometimes called "The New Negro," truly a renaissance in that a birth was possible because of a happy concatenation of events in the nineteen twenties. The rich collection from which these photographs are taken is a valuable resource which reflects the complexity of that era.

In a dozen photographs one can only catch glimpses of "The Harlem Renaissance," yet such glimpses can be extremely revealing. One definite suggestion in these selected photographs is the combination of strength and sometimes brooding dignity reflected in the faces of persons, such as Paul Robeson, within a movement which had its roots in the nineteenth century and earlier. Recognition of this fact also helps the observer to understand that in many ways what was begun in the nineteen twenties lives on into the present moment. Today we remain fascinated with the accomplishments of the Harlem Renaissance.

The photograph of W.E.B. DuBois, by Carl Van Vechten, included here is a striking portrait which illustrates my basic point. It was made in 1946. Similarly striking are the two concluding photos which make up this portfolio. They clearly reveal that what was born in the nineteen twenties flourished quite beyond those limited years. The vivid portrait of Dorothy West, also taken by Van Vechten in 1948, catches her vibrancy, something still beautifully evident in 1988, forty years later, when she came to Atlanta to speak upon the occasion of the publication of the first edition of this book.

In a related way, the photograph of Langston Hughes, included here as the last item, shows him with students in an Atlanta school in the nineteen forties and suggests the wonder of continuity. His poetry, as well as his spirit, reflected

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.