Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined

By Victor A. Kramer; Robert A. Russ | Go to book overview

THE OUTER REACHES:
THE WHITE WRITER AND BLACKS IN THE TWENTIES

RICHARD A. LONG

Langston Hughes's often-made remark that the Harlem Renaissance was the time when Negroes were in style immediately raises the question, with whom? In Only Yesterday by Frederick Lewis Allen, which lives up to its subtitle "An Informal History of the Nineteen-Twenties," Negroes are mentioned only as the objects of intolerance, along with Jews and, in some instances, Roman Catholics. No black writer or spokesman is referred to, and the only white writer Allen mentions who dealt with blacks in his work is Eugene O'Neill. Nevertheless scores of writers, journalists and editors are referred to in Allen's book. Of course Allen's concern is social history and not literary history. Thus it is necessary to see Hughes's remark in its true context, that of literary fashion, which occupies only a limited portion of the total matrix of any society, but which, at least to students of literature, wears well and longest, so that in retrospect we see a period primarily through its literary history.

Black folk entered the larger American consciousness in artistic form, dubiously, only at the end of the twenties in the nightly radio series, Amos and Andy, performed by two white vaudevillians who prospered so mightily that in the twilight of their years they were golf companions of President Eisenhower. An analogue to the burlesque of Amos and Andy, which was heir to black-faced minstrelry--always a source of laughter to the aryan out for a laugh--were the writings of Charleston-born Octavus Roy Cohen, who published short stories--mainly vignettes of black bumptiousness 1--regularly in the Saturday Evening Post from 1918 until well after the twenties.

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.